The Core Revisited

It was above one year ago that I did my first tracked close-up imaging of the milky way core. Using drift alignment I managed to achieve a pretty solid polar alignment using apps on my mobile phone. I’m still really happy with the image I was able to produce using my small Micro Four Third sensor Panasonic GX85 and Olympus 75mm f/1.8 lens, however having just treated myself to the new Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG DN Art Lens for Sony-E Mount I have certainly had my perception of what is possible shifted.

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Moon Glow

Had a near perfect alignment of the rising moon and the cathedral in the town where I live a few weeks ago and took my cameras out to a high point to see what I could capture. Had both my Panasonic GX85 with the Olympus 75-300mm @ 187mm (or 374mm Full Frame equivalent) and an Sony a7R with a Samyang 135mm set up using their internal intervalometer functions to capture the rise of the moon, and then again as I repositioned to get the moon transitioning behind the steeple of an old school building. I also had my Sony a7S III with me, so while these shots where being taken I took the opportunity to test a Picture Profile I had setup in my a7S III for use with low light video. Think it might be ok for urban environments, verdict is still out for use when away from all sources of ambient light. Anyway, not much in the way of a plan with this video, was quite happy with the way it came together.

Astrophotography: Tamron SP 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD

One of the great advantages of the Sony E-mount system is the reduced flange distance afforded by its mirrorless design. This allows for easy adaption of lenses designed for other camera systems such as the Canon EF or Nikon F mounts. For the last few years I have been using a Canon EF mount version of the Tamron SP 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD for astrophotography which I largely picked up for its optical image stabilisation for use with my unstabilised Sony a7S. There are certainly wider aperture prime lenses available in this popular 35mm to 50mm, however aperture isn’t everything. Having now sold my copy of this Tamron lens in favour of the much smaller and lighter Samyang 35mm f/1.8 Tiny Prime, I take the opportunity in this video to take a closer look at the astrophotography related performance of this lens before sending it on to its new owner.